Royds....

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Blue(UK)
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Royds....

Post by Blue(UK) » Sat Dec 09, 2017 7:15 pm

During my ride from Peak District to Kendal following the TET, I noticed many street names with ‘Royd’ in them and occasionally places with ‘Royd’ such as Mytholmroyd.
Every now and again I am reminded of this and think ‘I’ll see what it means when I get home’ but usually forget.
I’ve had a quick look with Google and that suggests it is a clearing(forest clearing) while others thing it’s where rivers meet.
Anyone know the answer? (It’s probably quite simple).
Inb4 haemoroyds jokes.

Thanks.
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davidlomax
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Re: Royds....

Post by davidlomax » Tue Dec 19, 2017 9:19 am

We have been based in Mytholmroyd for nearly 8 years and I often wondered the derivation of the Royd suffix myself. Enquiries led to similar conclusions to yourself, although the locally accepted version is that Royd comes from a Viking word meaning small camp/clearing in the woods.

Dave
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Blue(UK)
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Re: Royds....

Post by Blue(UK) » Wed Dec 20, 2017 3:51 pm

davidlomax wrote:
Tue Dec 19, 2017 9:19 am
We have been based in Mytholmroyd for nearly 8 years and I often wondered the derivation of the Royd suffix myself. Enquiries led to similar conclusions to yourself, although the locally accepted version is that Royd comes from a Viking word meaning small camp/clearing in the woods.

Dave
Thanks Dave, I’m pleased I’m not the only one to wonder about such things.
Next time I’m up that way, I’ll look out for them again and set up camp...!! 😎
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garyboy
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Re: Royds....

Post by garyboy » Sat Jan 27, 2018 8:32 pm

Rod is a word of Old English origin, the medieval name given to an assort -a piece of land cleared of trees-was distinguished by its being enclosed from the open land held in common adjacent to a village. Very few enclosures named "rod" appear after the Black Death (1349), perhaps because that upheaval put an end to large scale asserting.

The clearance of oak trees and the enclosure of the cleared land which became known as "Aycrode" is thus of very early date. About the fourteenth century the sound change characteristic of Yorkshire dialect converted 'rod' into 'royd', and the royds now to be found in West Yorkshire are almost too many to count.

https://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/i ... 810AAwanFp
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Blue(UK)
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Re: Royds....

Post by Blue(UK) » Fri Feb 09, 2018 2:42 pm

garyboy wrote:
Sat Jan 27, 2018 8:32 pm
Rod is a word of Old English origin, the medieval name given to an assort -a piece of land cleared of trees-was distinguished by its being enclosed from the open land held in common adjacent to a village. Very few enclosures named "rod" appear after the Black Death (1349), perhaps because that upheaval put an end to large scale asserting.

The clearance of oak trees and the enclosure of the cleared land which became known as "Aycrode" is thus of very early date. About the fourteenth century the sound change characteristic of Yorkshire dialect converted 'rod' into 'royd', and the royds now to be found in West Yorkshire are almost too many to count.

https://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/i ... 810AAwanFp
Interesting.
Thanks for the reply.
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